Tuesday, March 31, 2009

UGA Press receives grant for North American history series

The University of Georgia Press is one of three university presses to receive a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support “Early American Places,” a new scholarly book series devoted to early North American history. The UGA Press, New York University Press and Northern Illinois University Press will receive $648,000 over five years to publish twelve series titles annually.

The goal of the series is to publish books written by first-time authors that root developments in early North America to the specific places where they occurred. The three presses will focus on the regions where they have particular expertise: UGA Press on the Southeastern colonies, the Gulf South, and the Caribbean; NYU Press on the Northeastern and Middle Atlantic colonies; and NIU Press on the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi Valley.

“All three presses collaborating on the series are sensitive to the transnational turn in the study of early North America,” said Derek Krissoff, senior acquisitions editor at UGA Press and a co-author of the grant. “But we’re also sensitive to the things that are particular to where we live and work.The idea behind Early American Places is to combine the two—to look at how specific cities and counties and colonies and regions experienced, and contributed to, global phenomena like migration, trade and war. Scholarship undertaken at this scale can capture a level of texture that often gets lost in ‘bigger’ books.”

Deborah Gershenowitz, senior editor at NYU Press and the other co-author of the grant, added that the series was created specifically with junior faculty in mind. “First books in history are almost always revised dissertations, and many dissertations in early American history are regional in scope, drawing on town, county and colonial archives,” she said. “In part, this is a reflection of the fact that developments in early North America were often experienced and made sense of at a local level.”

“Our focus on place gets to the heart of history—real people, doing real things, in real places,” said NIU acquisitions editor Sara Hoerdeman. “The books in the series will also explore significant ideas and historical themes, but our books will be innovative by being grounded in a geographic place.”

The grant, which is being administered by the UGA Press, will fund a shared, centralized, external editorial service dedicated to the editing and production of books. The three presses will also combine marketing efforts. An editorial board of leading scholars of early American history who will help recruit outstanding manuscripts is currently being assembled.

“Regional American history is a very important part of our publishing program, and it is an area of the field that has been underserved due to the relatively tiny markets for such works,” said Steve Maikowski, director of NYU Press. “This new series will allow us to expand our publishing of outstanding original scholarship in the history of the Mid-Atlantic and New England regions.”

“We are honored that Mellon has chosen to lend us their support,” said Nicole Mitchell, director of UGA Press. “It’s gratifying to work collaboratively with our colleagues at other university presses, and this grant will be invaluable help to us all.”

“NIU Press has made a commitment in the past to publish in Early American history and in regional studies, and this collaborative series offers us a better opportunity to synthesize these areas,” said J. Alex Schwartz, director of NIU Press. “Moreover, I am delighted to be working with our fellow presses at Georgia and NYU.”

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Monday, March 30, 2009

UGA celebrates Historic Preservation Month in April

The College of Environment and Design’s Graduate Historic Preservation program will celebrate National Historic Preservation Month in April with campus activities including exhibitions, a barbeque, lectures and a historic landscape tour. The events will involve faculty, students, staff, the Student Historic Preservation Organization and the Honor Society of Sigma Pi Kappa.

The April observance aims to raise awareness of preservation within the larger university community and the Athens-Clarke County area and recognize the significance of the historic resources located both on and off campus. The entire university community and the greater Athens community are invited to participate in the different events.

The exhibition “Sustainable Preservation and Historic Landscapes” will be on display in the Main Library lobby, April 1-30. Two exhibitions will be on display in Caldwell Hall, April 3-30. “If Walls Could Talk: Then and Now at UGA,” will be at the Owens Library and “Orr 2: Interpreting the Legacy,” an artistic interpretation of Fred J. Orr’s architecture by Rene Shoemaker, will be at Circle Gallery located in G14 Caldwell Hall. The public is invited to an opening reception for the Orr 2 exhibition, April 3 from 4-7 p.m.

Suzanne Turner will present a lecture on “The Value of Historic Landscapes,” April 17 at 2:30 p.m. in the UGA Chapel. The event is free and open to the public. The SHPO also will host a preservation month speaker in April. See the master calendar for speaker time, and location. In conjunction with the college’s annual alumni meeting, April 17-18, activities on April 17 include:

- The annual Sigma Pi Kappa Preservation Month BBQ will be held at noon in Founders Memorial Garden. Tickets are $7.00 and reservations can be made via email at donnag@uga.edu.

- Sigma Pi Kappa will hold its induction ceremony at 11 a.m. in the Lumpkin House.

- Lindsey Kerr and Janine Duncan will conduct a historic landscape tour at 4 p.m. beginning in the Founders Memorial Garden and crossing North Campus to Old Athens Cemetery. This tour is limited to 20 participants. Reservations can be made via email at lkerr@uga.edu.

- Moving Midway, a documentary of plantation house relocation, will be shown at 8 p.m. in the garden.

In a cooperative effort with Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation, Hands-on-Athens, April 3-5, is included as part of the college’s Preservation Month activities. SHPO will be one of the house sponsors, providing volunteers for repair and rehabilitation.

While the national observance of Historic Preservation began in 1971, under the sponsorship of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, UGA’s participation in this annual observance began in 1983 with 2009 being the 26th year of participation.

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Thursday, March 26, 2009

Newnan-Coweta Historical Society Announces Tour of Homes For April 25

Antique Show & Appraisal Fair Also Held On Same Day

One of the best known and most highly anticipated of all the annual events in the City of Newnan is the Tour of Homes sponsored by The Newnan-Coweta Historical Society (NCHS). This year The Tour of Homes will be held in conjunction with an Antique Show and Appraisal Fair.

2009 Tour of Homes

Saturday, April 25, 2009 10AM – 5PM
Advance Tickets $12.00; Day of Tour $15.00
Please call 770-251-0207 for information & tickets
We accept Visa and Master Charge
Tickets also available from:
Coweta County Convention & Visitors Center
100 Walt Sanders Memorial Drive
770-254-2627
Scott’s Book Store
28 S Court Sq, Newnan
(770) 253-2960
Tickets include Antique Show And Appraisal Fair at The Train Depot History Center, Saturday, April 25, 2009

2009 Spring Tour of Homes

Gibson/Starr/Sides Home - Circa 1900 at 29 Temple Ave
Arnall-Mann Home/Welden Financial - Circa 1924 at 75 Jackson St
Cantwell Home - Built 2002 at 55 Jackson St
Farmer/Davis Home - Circa 1885 at 70 Jackson St
Jones/ Paulk Home - Circa 1900 at W. Hwy 16

Antique Show And Appraisal Fair

TRASH OR TREASURE?What's it worth?
The Newnan-Coweta Historical Society presents, in conjunction with our Annual Spring Tour of Homes, an Antiques Show and Sale and an opportunity to learn the value of one of your prized possessions.. Expert appraisers will be on hand to provide a casual, verbal estimate of the value of that family heirloom or the prized collectible. Certified written appraisals also available on many items.Saturday, April 25, 2009 10:00AM - 5:00PMDepot History Center60 East Broad Street, Newnan, GeorgiaVerbal appraisal fee - $2.00 For information: Dan Dietz (770-251-6245)

Information on this and other NCHS events can be found on their website or by contacting Tom Redwine at nchs@newnanbiz.net or at the Museum at 770-251-0207.
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Mercer Conference to Feature Noted Scholars of the American Founding

Mercer University’s Center for the Teaching of America’s Western Foundations will hold a conference on the American founding on March 31 and April 1 on the University’s Macon campus. The conference, titled “The Triumphs and Travails of the Natural Rights Republic,” will include presentations by several prominent scholars on American political thought, including Dr. Michael Zuckert, noted author and professor of political science at Notre Dame University, and Dr. John W. Danford, professor of political science at Loyola University Chicago. All of conference events are free and open to the public.

The conference will begin on the evening of March 31 with an address by Dr. Danford, who will give a presentation titled “The Intellectual Origins of the American Republic: The Case for the Scots.” His presentation will begin at 6:30 p.m. in the Neva Langley Fickling Recital Hall in the McCorkle Music Building. Dr. Danford will explain how the American founders were influenced by the major figures of the Scottish Enlightenment, including David Hume and Adam Smith, in conceiving of and designing institutions for a modern commercial republic.

“Dr. Danford is one of the country’s finest scholars of the development of political and economic liberty in the 18th Century,” said Dr. Will Jordan, associate professor of political science at Mercer. “He will show that the American founders were extremely up-to-date and influenced by the most cutting-edge political thought of their day.”

The conference will reconvene on April 1 with a student panel at 1 p.m. in the Fickling Recital Hall. The discussion will feature original research from Mercer students, focusing on the political theory and history of the early republic. Next, there will be a guest faculty panel at 3 p.m. in the Fickling Recital Hall, featuring research from Dr. Joseph Knippenberg of Oglethorpe University, Dr. Booker T. Ingram of Presbyterian College, and Dr. Eric Sands of Berry College.

“These excellent scholars will cover a variety of interesting topics,” Dr. Jordan said, “from how the founders understood the political importance of liberal education, to how the founders’ ideas were appreciated and applied by Abraham Lincoln.”

The conference’s keynote event will be a lecture on April 1 by Dr. Zuckert, titled “The Politics of Race and Slavery at the Constitutional Convention,” at 6 p.m. in Willingham Auditorium. Dr. Zuckert, author of the books Natural Rights and the New Republicanism, The Natural Rights Republic and Launching Liberalism: On Lockean Political Philosophy, is a leading scholar of the founding period, and his presentation will draw from his current research on the Constitutional Convention and offer a preview of his upcoming book.

“The controversy and debate over slavery at the Constitutional Convention is an under-explored topic,” said Dr. Matthew Oberrieder, assistant professor of philosophy at Mercer. “Dr. Zuckert’s talk promises to be very illuminating regarding the founders’ attitudes on race; for our students to get a sneak peek at a chapter in Dr. Zuckert’s next book is a real treat.”

Mercer’s Center for the Teaching of America’s Western Foundations is hosting the conference to further its mission to help a new generation of citizens acquire knowledge of, and appreciation for, the founding principles, values and history of our nation.

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Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Georgia Trust Sets 25th Annual Preservation Bash for Friday, April 17, at Mason Murer Fine Art

/PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation will hold its 25th annual Preservation Bash, The Art of Preservation, at Mason Murer Fine Art in Atlanta on Friday, April 17, 7:00 p.m.

This year's 2009 Preservation Bash promises to be more casual, more affordable, and more fun! Guests will begin their evening with cocktails and hors d'oeuvres provided by presenting caterer Jerry Dilts and Associates, while listening to jazz and swing music provided by the versatile band Kingsized. As the music gets livelier, six of Atlanta's most prominent caterers will unveil a sampling of signature entrees, followed by dancing and dessert. Enclosed lounge areas will provide conversational niches for those taking a break from the festivities; another will feature auction items, including quality art offered by local Atlantan and Georgian artists.

Tickets are $125 per person for members; $150 for non-members (includes membership to the Trust); and $100 for guests under 35. Tickets can be purchased by calling 404-885-7812. All proceeds benefit The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation.

This year's event chairs are May B. and Howell Hollis III. Honorary chairs are the Spalding family, who the Trust is honoring for carrying the tradition of appreciating Georgia's historic resources. The late Phinizy Spalding, longtime UGA professor of history, was a leader in historic preservation statewide and especially in Athens, Georgia. His nephews Charles, John and Bolling Spalding all served on the board of the Trust. They will attend the Preservation Bash along with Margie Spalding, Phinizy's wife; Melissa Spalding, Bolling's wife; Beth Spalding Nix and Lewis Nix; and Elizabeth Spalding Morgan and Jeff Morgan.

The Trust's first Preservation Ball was held in 1983. Since then it has been staged at several different venues, including the Georgia State Capitol, the Georgian Terrace Hotel and the Biltmore Ballrooms.

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Monday, March 23, 2009

Foster to Speak on Native Americans March 24 in Carrollton

Dr. Thomas Foster, director of the Antonio J. Waring Jr. Archaeological Laboratory, will present a Lunch and Learn program titled, “Spanish Soldiers, English Traders and the Formation of the Creek Confederacy,” on Tuesday, March 24, at the Ingram Library. The monthly series begins at noon and the community is invited to attend.

Foster, also an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology, has researched and authored books and articles on the complex native societies that the Spanish and English encountered in the Chattahoochee Valley during their settlement attempts in the region.

In addition to discussing the many ways European contact impacted Southern Native Americans, Foster will give special attention to the often misunderstood historical development of these societies and the formation of what became commonly known as the Creek tribe. The presentation will be followed by a question and answer session.

Foster’s most recently written book, “Archaeology of Lower Muskogee Creek Indians, 1715-1836,” was published in 2007. A museum exhibit developed by Foster and the associate curator of history at the Columbus Museum, “The Chattahoochee Valley: Colonial Frontier at the Columbus Museum” recently won the Historic Preservation Award from the Historic Columbus Foundation.

Foster joined the UWG faculty last summer and is the first endowed professor of anthropology at UWG through the Waring endowment. A $1 million gift from Henrietta Waring in memory of her late husband, Antonio J. Waring, Jr., funded the Antonio J. Waring, Jr. Anthropology Endowment and distinguished the university as one of a handful in the country that offers an endowed undergraduate anthropology program.

The endowment and a second gift made possible the endowed professorship, a thriving Waring Archaeological Laboratory, the Waring Distinguished Lecture Series and funding for an undergraduate anthropology degree program.

The Waring Laboratory curates nationally important collections from all over the southeast. Located on campus, the laboratory is the only facility of its type in Georgia and is specifically designed to meet both academic needs and federal standards for the curation of prehistoric and historic archaeological collections.

A native of Georgia, Foster earned his bachelor’s degree at the University of Georgia and his master’s and doctorate at Pennsylvania State University. Foster enjoys being an ambassador for education, archaeology and research with his passion focused on the study of Creek and Southeastern Native Americans, how they lived and the impact of Europeans upon their culture.

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Saturday, March 14, 2009

Atlanta History Center Events

Citizens & Soldiers: Life During the Civil War
Sunday, March 15, 2009
12:00 - 5:00 PM
Don't miss this engaging program designed for visitors of all ages. Enjoy guided tours of Turning Point: The American Civil War and discover stories of Confederate and Federal soldiers, along with the heartaches and hopes of loved ones at home, from the beginning of the crisis through the time of rebuilding. At Tullie Smith Farm, living history interpreters delve into African American experiences during the Civil War, speak about the lives of Confederate and Union soldiers, and explore the daily lives of women and children.
Learn more about this program and view the schedule of events.

Sheep to Shawl
Saturday, April 11, 2009
10:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Watch our sheep lose their winter coats! As the weather warms up, our sheep at Tullie Smith Farm are ready to shed their heavy coats. See as our sheep's wool is washed, carded, spun, dyed, and woven into a beautiful shawl. Take a tour of the 1860 Tullie Smith Farm house and learn about nineteenth-century farm life with demonstrations of blacksmithing, candle dipping, and open hearth cooking in our detached kitchen. Listen to old time music as you tour the gardens. And don't forget to meet our newest addition to the Gulf Coast Sheep family, Belle.
Learn more about this festival.

Veteran's Remembrance Day

Sunday, May 24, 2009
12:00 - 5:00 PM
Join us as we honor the contributions of veterans of World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, and today's conflicts. Meet veterans and hear their real stories of wartime through personal accounts and memorabilia. Interact with living history interpreters who share their authentic dress, equipment, and vehicles as men and women represent soldiers of the various wars.
Learn more about this program.

We invite you to visit the Atlanta History Center, located on 33 acres in the heart of Buckhead. The History Center includes one of the Southeast’s largest history museums; two historic houses including Swan House and Tullie Smith farm; Centennial Olympic Games Museum; historic gardens; and the Kenan Research Center. The History Center also includes the Margaret Mitchell House & Museum, located at our midtown campus.
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Friday, March 13, 2009

The Oconee War (1773-1796) Lecture at National Archives Morrow March 21

Origins and Consequences; Borderland Warfare and the Future of the State

March 21, 2009
10:00 AM
National Archives Morrow, GA

Steven Scurry will speak on pre-Revolutionary origins of the war and post war studies of both the Creek Nation and Georgia. The media presentation will use both historic maps, one presented publicly for the first time, and modern transpositions to present the land struggle from a ground level. A map fold out with an event chronology will be provided to Society members. The presentation will be followed by a question and answer period

Mr. Scurry graduated from Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School, home of the Foxfire project. He struck out across the country to find what remained of Native America -geographically and culturally. The people and places encountered in this youthful pilgrimage made a lasting and nurturing impression on him.

He studied Anthropology at Western Carolina University and finished a degree at the University of Georgia, all the while exploring southern landscapes and communities.

The war narrative emerged from a more organized study of 18th century manuscripts and maps, leading to an earlier era in American Indian/Georgia relations. These lectures and presentations are the result of nearly 10 years of study and research. A half dozen articles are in publication and a book is in the writing.

Sponsored by The Genealogical Society of Henry & Clayton Counties, Inc.

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Monday, March 9, 2009

"Mister Watson, Come Here"

The Birth of the Telephone

For many of us, trying to envision life without our various telephones would be like trying to lives without indoor plumbing. The telephone is 133 years old tomorrow. That's when Alexander Graham Bell made the first telephone call, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Over a wire to his
assistant in the next room, Bell said, "Mister Watson, come here, I want you."

At the time the public was slow to see the usefulness of the new invention. Now, the public has an insatiable appetite for phones and use them in ways Bell could not have imagined. We make more than a billion local calls each day - that's about four for every man, woman and child. And eight-out-of-10 of us now carry cell phones to continue our chats while working, shopping, and even driving.

The daily "Profile America" feature is courtesy of the U.S. Census Bureau.

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Wednesday, March 4, 2009

Georgia Southern University’s Henderson Library Set to Open Ben Franklin Exhibit

The Zach S. Henderson Library at Georgia Southern University has been selected to host a nationally-renowned traveling exhibition that celebrates the fascinating life of one of America’s Founding Fathers.

“Benjamin Franklin: In Search of a Better World” will be on display at the Henderson Library for six weeks beginning with an opening reception at 7 p.m. on March 14. The public is invited to join special guests, including Franklin family descendant Clare Ellis, on the first floor of the Zach S. Henderson Library for this event. The exhibition is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

“We are pleased and honored that this tribute to Benjamin Franklin is coming to our campus,” said W. Bede Mitchell, the dean of the Henderson Library. “It is an educational and entertaining exhibition that will appeal to both children and adults, and we hope that people throughout the region will take advantage of this opportunity to learn about a true American icon.”

“Benjamin Franklin: In Search of a Better World” is based on the major exhibition of the same name that was on display at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia through April 2006. The original exhibition coincided with the 300th anniversary of Franklin’s birth.

The opening lecture will be presented by Johnathan O’Neill, a Constitutional historian in Georgia Southern’s Department of History. He will discuss Franklin’s efforts to win France’s support during the American Revolution and his work during the Constitutional Convention of 1787.

In conjunction with the exhibition, the Henderson Library is sponsoring a series of programs that are free and open to the public. In addition, school children from throughout the area have been invited to visit the library and tour the exhibition.

Academic and public libraries from across the country that were interested in hosting the traveling exhibition were required to submit proposals to the American Library Association (ALA) Public Affairs Program, which made the final selections. Information Services Librarian JoEllen Broome made the proposal to the ALA on behalf of the Henderson Library.

Covering 1,000 square feet, the traveling exhibition features six sections of colorful, freestanding photo panels that incorporate representations of artifacts from the original exhibition.

The content is arranged in thematic sections that focus on Franklin as a youngster in Boston, his family and personal life, and the years in which he built his business as Philadelphia’s premier printer. The exhibition also looks at Franklin’s commitment to public service, his interest in medicine and public health, and his work in science and philosophy.

“We are delighted to have a brand-new, spacious, light-filled, cutting-edge facility now in which to showcase this milestone event – the first of many more to come,” said Broome.

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Tuesday, March 3, 2009

American Art Helping Students Picture America's History

/PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Teachers know that students get excited about history when it is presented to them as a story, and that pictures make stories come alive. While textbooks offer facts about historical figures, pictures and artwork introduce us to real people.

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has launched an initiative to give students of all ages and learning styles the opportunity to better understand our country's past, people and its ideals through art. Picturing America (PicturingAmerica.neh.gov) is a new education resource coming to 56,000 K-12 schools and libraries across the nation that tells America's story through forty images of great American art.

Pictures like Washington Crossing the Delaware allow students to enter into the great stories of our history. Seeing Washington lead a boat of patriots into battle for liberty inspires students to develop their own insights into important themes like freedom, leadership and democracy.

Art can inspire otherwise disengaged students. "I used the images in a lesson with fifth graders, where we looked at Bingham's The County Election and Karales' Selma-to-Montgomery March for Voting Rights in 1965," said Cheryl Wolf, a librarian at William McKinley School in New York City. "Some students, who don't ordinarily participate, were clearly drawn into the discussion by the visual element."

Proficient students think in new ways, developing cognitive, social and personal skills, when looking at art. "Through Picturing America, my students are forging a relationship with the history of United States, and are engaged in deep, creative thinking about the identity of our country," said Sara Paulson, a Library Media Specialist at Manhattan's PS 347, the American Sign Language and English School. "Children, many of whom are not even American citizens, are connecting to some of the landmark events of American history through these images in our school."

In addition to students at 56,000 libraries and K-12 schools, pre-elementary school students from economically disadvantaged families will also benefit from this program. All 20,000 Head Start centers across the U.S. are using Picturing America resources to promote early childhood and family learning.

Picturing America's images and resource book are available for everyone online at www.PicturingAmerica.neh.gov.

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