Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Georgia Historical Society Holds Summer Classes in History, Preservation, and Genealogy

Register for Classes Now While Seats are Still Available!

Join the Georgia Historical Society this summer for a series of entertaining and informative classes, workshops, and tours on a variety of topics in history, genealogy, and archival preservation.

Classes and workshops will be held in the reading room of historic Hodgson Hall, GHS's headquarters at the corner of Whitaker and Gaston Streets in downtown Savannah. Tours will also begin in the reading room. All classes, tours, and workshops must meet a minimum enrollment and some class sizes are limited, so make your reservations early!

Visit http://www.georgiahistory.com/ to view course descriptions, prices, and to make reservations. For more information, please call 912.651.2125 ext. 40. GHS members will receive a 10% discount for all classes.

For more information, and to read a full press release, click here.

The Georgia Historical Society, headquartered in Savannah, is the oldest cultural institution in the state and one of the oldest historical organizations in the nation. It is the first and only statewide historical society in Georgia. For nearly 175 years, GHS has collected, preserved, and shared Georgia history through a variety of educational outreach programs, publications, and research services. For more information visit: http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102592715303&s=132&e=001BKePP-eUhddQw8A7E9TX2bT4vAbhty2vsQeecO8A8r2zDgndISDRvFffxLQY17krkOVDu2vnWOGbYVCraUmxwRSw7sNDo52s9ny5sdKyzvSJ2NuDvo-Y4w==.
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Friday, May 22, 2009

Fayette: Holliday-Dorsey-Fife Museum Receives Official Listing in the National Register of Historic Places

Last Saturday, a ceremony and official unveiling was held at the Holliday-Dorsey-Fife Museum in downtown Fayetteville to recognize their designation and listing on the National Register of Historic Places. The Register is the nation’s list of historic buildings deemed worthy of preservation. The designation comes from the National Park Service, Dept. of the Interior and is administered at the state level by the Georgia State Historic Preservation Officer.

The registration process was a long time in the making; starting with a group of volunteers back in 1996. After exhaustive research and historical photos, plats, and biographical sketches were gathered, the application was submitted in 2005.

Finally, in April 2008, a letter arrived informing the City and Museum that the Holliday-Dorsey-Fife House application was accepted and the property was officially listed on the National Register.

Only two other structures in Fayette County have received this designation: the original Fayette County Courthouse and the former Tandy King House that was located on Hwy 92S.

Adding to this special day, was the fact that descendants from all three, historic families attended the ceremony; a rare and historic occurrence of its own. After the ceremony, some of the descendants could be seen exchanging stories and histories of their ancestry.

The Holliday-Dorsey-Fife Museum exhibits the history of Fayette County and its residents, including a wide range of Gone With the Wind artifacts on permanent display. It is open for tours, Thursday-Saturday, 10am – 6pm.
Photo: L - R: Debi Riddle, Museum Docent, Fayetteville Mayor Ken Steele, John Lynch, Museum Manager, and Al Hovey-King, Downtown Development Authority Chairman.

Congratulations to the Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum

Governor Sonny Perdue signed House Bill 108 into law in April making Savannah’s Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum the official Georgia historical civil rights museum. The Savannah landmark is named in honor of the late Dr. Ralph Mark Gilbert, Father of Savannah’s modern day Civil Rights movement.

The museum chronicles the civil rights struggle of Georgia's oldest African American community. The three floors feature historic photographic and interactive exhibits, including an NAACP organizational exhibit and a fiber-optic map of eighty-seven significant civil rights sites and events.

A bronze bust of Gilbert highlights the exhibits on the museum's first floor, which also features a recreation of the Azalea Room of Levy's Department Store, where blacks could buy clothing but could not eat in the restaurant.

The mezzanine houses a theater, which is a facsimile of an African American church sanctuary, where Savannah activist W.W Law and other leaders reflect on Savannah's civil rights struggle. A visual montage of West Broad Street's people and its commerce gives visitors a glimpse of its history. The second floor features lecture halls, classrooms, and a computer room. It also has a video/reading room and an African American book collection for children.

The vision of Law and Gilbert came to fruition in the museum. Thousands of visitors from around the world tour the museum, where people of all races can share a glimpse of the struggle for African American civil rights.

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Tuesday, May 19, 2009

Scientists Announce the Discovery of a 47-Million-Year-Old Primate Fossil that is Set to Revolutionize Our Understanding of Human Evolution

/PRNewswire/ -- Scientists have announced today the discovery of a 47-million-year-old human ancestor. Discovered in the Messel Pit, Germany, the fossil is twenty times older than most fossils that explain human evolution. Known as "Ida," the fossil is a transitional species, showing characteristics of the very primitive nonhuman evolutionary line (prosimians, such as lemurs), but even more closely those of the human evolutionary line (anthropoids, such as monkeys, apes, and humans). This places Ida at the very root of anthropoid evolution -- when primates were first developing the features that would evolve into our own. The scientists' findings are published today by PLoS One, the open-access journal of the Public Library of Science.

Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, will publish THE LINK, by Colin Tudge, on Wednesday, May 20, 2009. The book will reveal in full detail the entire story of the discovery, excavation, and preservation, and the revolutionary significance of Ida. THE LINK begins with a foreword by Norwegian fossil scientist Dr. Jorn Hurum of the University of Oslo's Natural History Museum, who for the past two years has led an international team of scientists as they secretly conducted a detailed forensic analysis of the extraordinary fossil, studying the data to decode humankind's ancient origins. At 95 percent complete, Ida is set to revolutionize our understanding of human evolution.

Unlike Lucy and other famous primate fossils found in Africa's Cradle of Mankind, Ida is a European fossil, preserved in Germany's Messel Pit, a mile-wide crater whose oil-rich shale is a significant site for fossils of the Eocene Epoch. Fossil analysis reveals that the prehistoric primate was a young female. Opposable big toes and nails rather than claws confirm that the fossil is a primate, and the presence of a talus bone in the foot links Ida directly to humans.

The fossil also features the complete soft body outline as well as the gut contents. A herbivore, Ida feasted on fruits, seeds, and leaves. X-rays reveal both baby and adult teeth, and the lack of a "toothcomb," which is an attribute of lemurs. The scientists estimate Ida's age when she died to be approximately nine months, and she measured approximately two feet in length.

-- Ida lived 47 million years ago, at a critical period in the Earth's
history. Her life fell within the Eocene Epoch, a time when the
blueprints for modern mammals were being established. After dinosaurs
became extinct, early horses, bats, whales, and many other creatures,
including the first primates, thrived on a subtropical planet. The
Earth was just beginning to take the shape that we know and recognize
today -- the Himalayas were being formed and modern flora and fauna
were evolving. Land mammals, including primates, lived amid vast
jungles.

-- Ida was found to be lacking two of the key anatomical features found
in lemurs: a grooming claw on the second digit of the foot, and a
fused row of teeth in the middle of her lower jaw, known as a
toothcomb. She has nails rather than the claws typical of
nonanthropoid primates such as lemurs, and her teeth are similar to
those of monkeys. Her forward-facing eyes are like ours -- which would
have enabled her fields of vision to overlap, allowing 3-D vision and
an ability to judge distance.

-- The fossil's hands show a humanlike opposable thumb. Like all
primates, Ida has five fingers on each hand. Her opposable thumb would
have provided a precision grip. In Ida's case, this would have been
useful for climbing and gathering fruit; in our case, it allows
important human functions such as making tools and writing. Ida also
would have had flexible arms, which would have allowed her to use both
hands for any task that cannot be done with one -- like grabbing a
piece of fruit.

-- Evidence of a talus bone links Ida to us. The bone has the same shape
as it does in humans today, though the human talus is obviously
bigger. Extensive X-rays, CT scanning, and computer tomography reveal
Ida to have been about nine months old when she died and provide clues
to her diet, which included berries and plants. Furthermore, the lack
of a bacculum (penis bone) means that the fossil was definitely
female.

-- X-rays reveal that a broken wrist may have contributed to Ida's death
-- her left wrist was healing from a bad fracture. The scientists
believe she was overcome by carbon dioxide gas while she was drinking
from the Messel Lake; the still waters of the lake were often covered
with a low-lying blanket of the gas as a result of the volcanic forces
that formed the lake and were still active. Hampered by her broken
wrist, Ida slipped into unconsciousness, was washed into the lake, and
sank to the bottom, where the unique conditions preserved her for 47
million years.

THE LINK will be published in the United Kingdom by Little, Brown, in Germany by Piper Verlag, and in France by JC Lattes. The findings of the two-year study will also be revealed by Atlantic Productions in a special documentary film, The Link, to be screened by History on Monday May 25, 2009, at 9:00 p.m. EDT/PDT, and broadcast worldwide in over twenty countries.

An interactive, content-rich website about Ida has been launched at www.revealingthelink.com.

The full scientific findings from the study are set out in the paper "Complete primate skeleton from the middle Eocene of Messel in Germany: morphology and paleobiology," published by PLoS One, the Public Library of Science's interactive open-access journal for the communication of peer-reviewed scientific and medical research (www.plosone.org).

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Learning About Lavender and Long Bows May 23

Generations Gallery in the Historic Village at Indian Springs presents a summer full of learning experiences that preserve and promote the traditions of the useful creative arts. On Saturday May 23rd, the Gallery will present LAVENDER AND LONG BOWS: Skills from the past.

Growing lavender and refinishing a long bow may not seem to have a lot in common until you see them both as traditions that involve all members of the family, and were meant to be passed on to generations to come.

Sheila Looman of Celestial Blessings will be set up to sell freshly harvested herbs and plants at the Generations Gallery in The Historic Village at Indian Springs on Saturdays mornings from 10:00 am - Noon. To kick off the season on May 23rd, she will demonstrate and share her knowledge of how to use LAVENDER to make a variety of all-natural made-at-home products. Visitors will learn tips on how to grow lavender in Georgia, and Sheila will have both plants and freshly harvested lavender for purchase.

At 10:00 am, Chuck Mulky will present a BOW REFINISHING demonstrationat the Gallery. The demonstration is free - an ideal introduction to archery for children. Bows for adults and children will be available for purchase and can be refinished with materials provided during the
demonstrations. Both styles, the Native American and the English Long Bow, are made by Jim Taylor, a half blood member of the Choctaw Indian Nation and a recognized Master Artisan Member of the National Indian Arts and Crafts Board
.
Generations Gallery offers FREE CLASSES IN ART AND WRITING, along with FRESH PRODUCE from local farms, on Saturdays from May until August. The Whimsical Botanical Garden in the historic village is now open and a visit is an ideal "green" experience for children to see how organic produce is grown. The Gardens are free and children can explore the Enchanted Forest, plant a seed and take it home, and marvel at the collection of toys and characters in the garden designed by Ms. Frankie Willis. Ms. Joe Bush, is on site to talk to
visitors about natural organic growing methods for Middle Georgia. Pinky's Cafe' is open for lunch, where the children can taste the produce grown in The Garden.

The Historic Village is a wonderful get away for Georgians who want to vacation without spending a lot of money this year. The Indian Springs Hotel is a recently restored museum that is open for tours on weekends from Memorial Day thru Labor Day. This is the actual building where the Treaty of 1825 was signed by the Creek Indians. Located at the entrance to the Indian Springs State Park, the Village celebrates the long history of the area as a Mineral Springs Resort, popular in the 1900s. The state park, built by FDR's Civilian Projects Corps in the Depression Years of the 1930s, still allows visitors to get water from the natural spring which the Indians believed would heal mind, body, and spirit.

For more information, go to www.theVillageatIndianSprings.com/ gallery and www.buttscountyhistoricalsociety.org. For Information about overnight accommodations in the village' s vintage cottages and the shops, call 770-775-5350. For details about boating, camping and cabins at the state park, go to www.gastateparks.org/info/indspr. A natural habitat wildlife exhibit can be found at nearby Dauset Trails Nature Center, only a donation is ever asked at all of these art• history• nature experiences in middle Georgia, between Atlanta and Macon. Call 770-227-4002 for more details.

From I-75, take EXIT 205 Hwy 16, go East thru Jackson, turning right on Hwy 42 South, go about six miles; follow the signs to Indian Springs State Park. Generations Gallery,1825 Highway 42 South, Flovilla GA 30216.

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Sunday, May 17, 2009

Today in Fayetteville, April 16, 1909

 An Interesting look into Fayette's past

                       THE FAYETTEVILLE NEWS

                     
    Today in Fayetteville, April 16, 1909

                                  Home Affairs

Your friends in Senoia will be glad to hear from you by long distance Bell Telephone. A 3 minute talk cost only 20 cents. Call "long Distance.

                       Dames of the Revaluation

The Dames of the Revolution is an American Society organized in 1896 and composed of women above the age of 18 years, of good moral character, who are descended in their own right from an ancestor who assisted in establishing American Independence during the War of the Revolution. It s main purpose is to foster the spirit of patriotism.

                   War on Reckless Drivers of Automobiles

New York City-There is no mistake about it this time, public indignation against the "Scorchers" and "Joyriders" is thoroughly aroused and they are going to be vigorously delt with. The newly formed Highways protective Assoc. and the "Automobile Club of America" representing some and responsible owners and drivers of automobiles are prepared to aide in prosecuting offenders.
So much for the offenders when cough, and the arrangements for catching them are more wide spread and complete than ever before. As a result of the organization of the "special squad" of policeman mounted on bicycles, motor wheels, and some in automobiles.

Our town keeps growing. Tom Orr is building a residence and will soon move in. He will operate the Blacksmith shop.

Last Sunday night Miss Geneva Harper died at the home of her mother two miles north of here, She was taken ill the week of her fathers death and lingered along until her death Sunday night


researched and submitted CB Glover


Saturday, May 16, 2009

Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation Presents 21 Statewide Preservation Awards at Ceremony in Augusta

/PRNewswire / -- The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation today presented 16 awards recognizing the best of preservation in Georgia during its Preservation Awards ceremony in Augusta.

Union Baptist Church in Augusta received the Marguerite Williams Award, presented annually to the project that has had the greatest impact on preservation in the state. The circa 1851 building also received an award in the Excellence in Restoration category.

Union Baptist Church formed a unique partnership with Historic Augusta, Inc. The success of the project inspired the revitalization of the Greene Street corridor that currently hosts several ongoing preservation projects.

The Trust also presented two awards for Excellence in Restoration, fourteen awards for Excellence in Rehabilitation, two for Excellence in Preservation Services, and three for Excellence in Stewardship.

The Excellence in Restoration winners were Union Baptist Church in Augusta and Savannah College of Art and Design's Ivy Hall in Atlanta.

Excellence in Rehabilitation winners were: William F. Brantley House, Savannah; Second Assistant Keeper's Cottage, Tybee Island; William Barker Whiskey Bonding Barn, Pike County; Harmony Grove Cemetery, Atlanta; South Georgia College's Clower Hall, Coffee County; Gospel Pilgrim Cemetery, Athens; Rourke-Butler Cottage, Tybee Island; Toccoa Historic Commercial District, Stephens County; Heritage Academy, Augusta; Rees Park Economic Development Center and Oak Grove Cemetery, Americus; Savannah State College's Hill Hall, Savannah; 348 Seavy Street, Coweta County; Appling County Courthouse, Baxley; and the Woodson-Dekle House, Thomasville.

Excellence in Preservation Services winners were the Georgia Department of Transportation's Water Witch Project, an underwater archaeological survey to locate a sunken Civil War vessel, Chatham County and NewTown Macon's Historic Marker project, Macon.

Excellence in Stewardship winners were: Whittier Mill Village Association, Atlanta; Madison, Georgia's Newton family for its preservation of the mid 19th-century estate, Boxwood; and Troup County Historical Society, LaGrange.

"This year's winners represent a tremendous dedication to restoring and revitalizing Georgia's historic buildings and communities," said Mark C. McDonald, president of The Georgia Trust. "We are proud to honor such deserving projects and individuals."

For 31 years, the Trust has recognized preservation projects and individuals throughout Georgia who have made significant contributions to the field of historic preservation. Awards are presented on the basis of the contributions of the person or project to the community and/or state and on compliance with the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties.

The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation is one of the country's largest statewide, nonprofit preservation organizations. Founded in 1973, the Trust is committed to preserving and enhancing Georgia's communities and their diverse historic resources for the education and enjoyment of all.

The Trust generates community revitalization by finding buyers for endangered properties acquired by its Revolving Fund; provides design assistance to 102 Georgia Main Street cities and encourages neighborhood revitalization; trains teachers in 63 Georgia school systems to engage students in discovering state and national history through their local historic resources; and advocates for funding, tax incentives and other laws aiding preservation efforts.

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Friday, May 15, 2009

Nearly 300 Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation 'Ramblers' to Roam Around Augusta This Weekend

/PRNewswire / -- The rich historic culture of Augusta, Ga. will be showcased during The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation's Annual Meeting & Spring Ramble which starts Friday, May 15 and concludes Sunday afternoon, May 17.

During these three days, Trust members, friends, and others interested in saving and preserving Georgia's historic places will visit more than 20 historic sites and private homes in the area and recognize top projects throughout the state with awards of excellence for preservation.

The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation will hold its Annual Meeting on Saturday, May 16, at 10 a.m. at Saint Paul's Church. Meeting attendees will hear an update on the State of Preservation in Georgia from Mark C. McDonald, president and CEO of The Georgia Trust, and Dr. Ray Luce, the state's deputy historic preservation officer. The Trust will also announce during the meeting its four scholarship winners and the recipient of the J. Neel Reid Prize, a $4,000 fellowship for travel study given to an emerging Georgia architect. Following the Annual Meeting, Dr. Lee Ann Caldwell, Director of the Center for the Study of Georgia History at Augusta State University, will give a brief lecture about Augusta's colorful past.

On Friday, Saturday and Sunday afternoons, Georgia Trust Ramblers will "ramble" through more than 20 historic sites and private residences in the area, many of which are not normally open to the public.

Friday's Ramble will feature the stately homes of Summerville. Ramblers will dine Friday evening at Sacred Heart Cultural Center, a turn-of-the-century Romanesque Revival style church, followed by the 31st Annual Preservation Awards ceremony, which salutes more than two dozen projects and individuals for exceptional work in the fields of restoration, rehabilitation and preservation throughout the state. The awards ceremony is scheduled to begin at 7:30 p.m., also at Sacred Heart Cultural Center.

On Saturday Ramblers will tour a wide variety of downtown sites before enjoying dinner at Sutherland Mill.

The weekend ends with a brunch on Sunday from 9 to 11 a.m. at Julian Smith Barbeque Pavilion, followed by a "ramble" through McDuffie County.

Friday's Ramble registration will be at the Joseph R. Lamar Boyhood Home, 415 Seventh Street, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday's registration will be at Saint Paul's Church Cemetery, 605 Reynolds Street, starting at 8:30 a.m.

The event is held in partnership with Historic Augusta, Inc. Sponsors include the Georgia Tourism Foundation, Brandon Wilde retirement community, R.W. Allen, Downtown Development Authority of Augusta, and Mr. and Mrs. Braye C. Boardman.

Founded in 1973, The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation is one of the country's largest statewide, nonprofit preservation organizations.

Committed to preserving and enhancing Georgia's communities and their diverse historic resources for the education and enjoyment of all, the Trust generates community revitalization by finding buyers for endangered properties acquired by its Revolving Fund for endangered properties; provides design assistance to 102 Georgia Main Street cities and encourages neighborhood revitalization; trains Georgia's teachers to engage students in 63 Georgia school systems to discover state and national history through their local historic resources; and advocates for funding, tax incentives and other laws aiding preservation efforts.

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Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Atlanta History Center Summer Events

We'll post these on the Fayette Front Page and Georgia Front Page calendars so you don't need to save this or print it. We thought you might want to go ahead and mark your calendar --- there are a few things on here that are going on our calendars! - GFP Staff

TRAVELING EXHIBITIONS

Edward L. Daugherty, A Southern Landscape Architect: Exploring New Forms
(Kenan Research Center, Archives Gallery)
On display through October 10, 2009

Edward L. Daugherty, A Southern Landscape Architect: Exploring New Forms traces the seminal works in landscape architecture, urban planning, conservation, and historic preservation created by celebrated Atlanta landscape architect, Edward L. Daugherty. Throughout more than fifty years of continuous private practice as a landscape architect, Daugherty not only devoted both his time and talents to providing outstanding service to his clients but also to numerous public service projects that have had a beneficial impact on the landscape architectural profession and the physical environment in Georgia, the Southeast, and the nation.

This exhibit is free to the public and available to view Wednesday through Saturday, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm in the Kenan Research Center at the Atlanta History Center. For more information, please call 404.814.4000 or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com.

Native Lands: Indians and Georgia
(Atlanta History Center, Howell Gallery)
On display through Summer 2009

Native Lands: Indians and Georgia celebrates the state’s original inhabitants beginning with the Mississippian peoples and continuing with their descendants, the Creeks and the Cherokees. Long before the first European settlers came to what is now called Georgia, the Mississippian Indians developed complex societies on these lands – complete with art, music, ceremony, agriculture, architecture, and trade industries. The Creeks and Cherokees left landmarks and cultural legacies prior to their 1830s removal from the state on the Trail of Tears. Unlike most accounts, which stop with the Trail of Tears, Native Lands is a traveling exhibition that explores Indians’ recent history and their continuing connections to Georgia through the voices of contemporary Creeks and Cherokees. Highlights of the exhibit include a 1700s Creek town busk replica and an 1800s Cherokee family hearth scene showing the blending of native and European cultures.

This exhibit is included with general admission, and is free to Atlanta History Center members. For more information, please call 404.814.4000 or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com.

Support: Native Lands: Indians and Georgia has been made possible by the National Endowment for the Humanities, with additional support from The Noble Foundation and The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. The original exhibition has been the recipient of several awards, including an Award of Merit from the American Association of State and Local History and the Curators’ Award from the Southeastern Museums Conference.

FAMILY AND ADULT EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING

Programs and dates are subject to change.
Please call 404.814.4033 or 404.814.4082 to confirm program dates.

June 2009

MMH Lecture: Wendy Wax, The Accidental Bestseller
Wednesday, June 3, 2009
6:00 pm Reception; 7:00 pm Lecture

Once upon a time, four aspiring authors met at a writers’ conference. Mallory St. James is a workaholic whose novels support her lavish lifestyle. Tanya Mason juggles jobs, kids, and a difficult mother. Faye Truett is the wife of a televangelist and author of inspirational romances – no one would ever guess her explosive secret. Kendall Aims’ career is on the skids, as is her marriage. Her sales have fallen, her editor can barely feign interest in her work, and her husband is cheating on her.

Under pressure to meet her next deadline, Aims holes up in a mountain cabin to confront a blank page and a blanker future. Her friends, however, won’t let her face this struggle alone. They collaborate on a novel using their own lives as fodder, assuming no one will discover the truth behind their words until the book becomes a runaway bestseller. With success comes scrutiny and scandal and all bets are off as the four friends realize how little they know each other.

Wendy Wax is the author of seven novels, including Single in Suburbia and Hostile Makeover, from which excerpts were printed in Cosmopolitan. Wax lives in suburban Atlanta with her husband and teenage sons.

This lecture is held at Margaret Mitchell House in Midtown. Admission is $5 for members and $10 for nonmembers. Reservations are required for all lectures. For more information, visit GWTW.org. To purchase tickets, please call 404.814.4150.

Southern Music: Shaken & Stirred: “Soul Stirrin’ Sounds”
Thursday, June 4, 2009; Friday, June 5, 2009
Doors open 6:00 pm; Concert 7:30 pm

The Atlanta History Center announces, Southern Music: Shaken & Stirred. This new music series showcases a variety of popular music genres including Soul, Southern Rock, Jazz Fusion, and Blues. Each concert features a roster of both up and coming artists and local legends that are among the best in their fields and whose music is deeply rooted in the South. June’s concert features “Soul Stirrin’ Sounds” performances by three singer/songwriters Anthony David, John West, and Kyshona Armstrong.

Delicious food and assorted adult libations are available for purchase. Concerts are held the first Thursday and Friday of the month, March - June. Thursday concerts are $20 for members, $25 for nonmembers. Friday concerts are $25 for members, $35 for nonmembers. Other pricing options are available including season tickets and reserved tables for 10. Reservations are required. Please call 404.814.4150. For more information, please call 404.814.4000 or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com for more information on the performers.

Support: Southern Music: Shaken & Stirred is supported by Publix and Delta Air Lines. Promotional support provided by Sweetwater and Sunday Paper.

Summer Camp 2009 at the Atlanta History Center

This summer, dive into history at the Atlanta History Center with exciting and enriching activities. Every
week has a new theme, so choose your favorites and join us.

· NEW! Play With the Past: Adventures in History, June 1-5 (Ages 4-6)
· MIDDLE SCHOOL CAMP! Curator Camp: Exhibiting Atlanta, June 8-12
· Fun on the Farm, June 8-12 (GRADES 1-3)
· Who Was Here First?, June 15-19 (GRADES 1-3 & 4-6)
· Flavors of America, June 22-26 (GRADES 1-3 & 4-6)

Camp fees are $200 for members; $250 for nonmembers. Camp hours run Monday through Friday, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm. To register your camper, please call 404.814.4016. For more details and information, visit www.AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/summercamp.

Summer Camp 2009 at Margaret Mitchell House

This summer, explore a range of topics, engage in quality activities, and expand upon creative skills. Every week has a new theme, so choose your favorites and join us.

· Illustration: Art hiSTORY 101, June 1-5 (GRADES 2-4)
· Mystery in the City: Haunts and Habitats, June 8-12 (GRADES 5-9)
· Stories in Pictures: Creating Comics, June 15-19 (GRADES 5-9)
· Personal Essay/Autobiography: A History of Me, June 22-26 (GRADES 9-12)

Camp fees are $350 per week for Atlanta History Center members/$400 per week for nonmembers.
Camp hours run Monday through Friday, 9:30 am – 4:30 pm. To register your camper, please call 404.814.4016. For more details and information, visit www.GWTW.org.

Family History Research: Searching Military Records, from the Civil War to World War I
Saturday, June 6, 2009
10:00 am - Noon

Join Atlanta History Center staff genealogist Mike Brubaker as he helps family historians discover new resources to use in genealogy searches. Military records are incredibly abundant, yet difficult to search. This Atlanta History Center program will provide advice and tips on where and how to find records for our veteran ancestors.

Admission is $10 for members and $15 for nonmembers. Reservations are suggested, please call 404.814.4150. For more information, please call 404.814.4041 or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com.

Operation Homecoming: Writing the Wartime Experience
Free Weekly Creative Workshops

The Atlanta History Center proudly supports Operation Homecoming. This unique literary program presented by the National Endowment for the Arts encourages American military personnel who have served our nation in both current and past conflicts to record their stories and reflections.

Over 6,000 troops, veterans, and military families have shared their stories through Operation Homecoming writing workshops and activities since 2004.

Active duty troops, veterans, and their families are invited to participate. During the month of June, free weekly creative writing workshops led by Atlanta author and journalist Jedwin Smith, provide the opportunity for participants to improve their writing skills at the Atlanta VA Medical Center. For more information on dates and locations, please contact MEisenhart @AtlantaHistoryCenter.com or call 404.814.2063.

Support: Operation Homecoming is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Operation Homecoming is administered by the Southern Arts Federation and is made possible with support from The Boeing Company.

Livingston Lecture: Liaquat Ahamed, Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World
Tuesday, June 9, 2009
8:00 pm

Most people believe the Great Depression was the result of a convergence of events beyond the control of any one person or of the federal government. Investment manager Liaquat Ahamed reveals that decisions taken by a small number of central bankers were the primary cause of the economic meltdown, the effects of which were felt until World War II and reverberated for decades.

As another period of economic turmoil makes headlines today, the Great Depression and the year 1929 remain the benchmarks for true financial mayhem. Offering a new understanding of the global nature of financial crises, Lords of Finance is a potent reminder of the enormous impact of financial decisions, of the fallibility of central bankers, and of the severe human consequences that result when they are wrong.

Ahamed holds degrees in economics from Harvard and Cambridge Universities and has been a professional investment manager for 25 years. He worked at the World Bank in Washington, D.C., and at the New York-based institutional investment partnership Fischer Francis Trees & Watts, where he served as the chief executive. He is currently an adviser to several hedge fund firms, including Rock Creek Group and Rohatyn Group, is a director of Aspen Insurance, and is on the board of trustees of the Brookings Institution.

Admission is $5 for members and $10 for nonmembers. Reservations are required for all lectures. For more information or to purchase tickets, please call 404.814.4150.

Support: The Livingston Lectures are made possible with generous funding from the Livingston Foundation of Atlanta.

Teachers’ Course: Southeastern Indians
June 15 – 19, 2009
9:00 am – 4:00 pm

Explore key moments in Native American history and culture - focusing on the Southeastern United States. The Southeastern Indians Teacher Institute is being offered in conjunction with the Atlanta History Center’s Native Lands: Indians and Georgia exhibit.

The exhibit celebrates the state’s original inhabitants beginning with the Mississippian people and continuing with their descendants, the Creeks and the Cherokees. Unlike most accounts, which stop with the Trail of Tears, Native Lands explores Indians’ recent history and their continuing connections to Georgia through the voices of contemporary Creeks and Cherokees.

Teachers earn 3 Professional Learning Units. For more information, please visit www.AtlantaHistoryCenter.com. To register, please call 404.814.4110.

MMH Lecture: Gigi Levangie Grazer, Queen Takes King
Thursday, June 18, 2009
6:00 pm Reception; 7:00 pm Lecture

Hell breaks loose when New York real estate titan Jacks Power decides to divorce Cynthia, a former ballerina and Park Avenue princess, to marry Lara, his mistress and America’s favorite morning news anchor. Power gets what he wants, but what if what he wants isn’t what he needs? Queen Takes King is a funny, sexy, take-no-prisoner exploration of what happens when the king and queen of Manhattan divorce after a 25-year marriage.

Gigi Levangie Grazer is the author of three novels, including Rescue Me, Maneater, and The Starter Wife. The Starter Wife was adapted into an Emmy Award-winning USA Network miniseries starring Debra Messing and a subsequent television series. Maneater was adapted for a Lifetime miniseries starring Sarah Chalke. Grazer also wrote the screenplay for Stepmom, starring Julia Roberts and Susan Sarandon. Grazer’s articles have appeared in Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, and Glamour. She lives in Los Angeles with her two children and three miniature dachshunds.

This lecture is held at Margaret Mitchell House in Midtown. Admission is $5 for members and $10 for nonmembers. Reservations are required for all lectures. For more information, visit GWTW.org. To purchase tickets, please call 404.814.4150.

Elson Lecture: David O. Stewart, Impeached: The Trial of President Andrew Johnson and the Fight for Lincoln's Legacy
Tuesday, June 23, 2009
8:00 pm

Impeached traces the explosive impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson to its roots in the social and political revolutions that rocked the South with the end of slavery and the Civil War. As president after Lincoln’s assassination, Johnson, a Tennessee Democrat, not only failed to heal the nation’s wounds but rubbed them raw, ignoring widespread violence against the freed slaves and encouraging former rebels to resume political control of the Southern states.

Johnson’s high-handed actions were opposed by the equally angry and aggressive Congress, controlled by the Radical Republicans, who were ardent foes of slavery and aimed to rebuild American society on principles of equality and fairness. The collision between Congress and the president culminated through the constitutional impeachment process in a legal dispute over whether Johnson could fire his own secretary of war, Edwin M. Stanton.

Stewart, bestselling author of The Summer of 1787: The Men Who Invented the Constitution, challenges traditional interpretations portraying Johnson as heir to Lincoln’s political legacy. Instead, Impeached shows the compelling reasons to remove the president from office, reveals the corrupt bargains that saved Johnson by a single vote, and credits Johnson’s prosecutors with seeking to remake the nation to accord with the ideals that Lincoln championed and for which the Civil War was fought.

Admission is $5 for members and $10 for nonmembers. Reservations are required for all lectures. For more information, visit www.AtlantaHistoryCenter.com. To purchase tickets, please call 404.814.4150.

Support: The Elson Lectures feature scholarly addresses by our nation’s prominent historians and are made possible with generous funding from Ambassador and Mrs. Edward Elson.

July 2009

Summer Camp 2009 at the Atlanta History Center

This summer, dive into history at the Atlanta History Center with exciting and enriching activities. Every week has a new theme, so choose your favorites and join us.

· Sport and Spirit, July 6-10 (GRADES 1-3 & 4-6)
· America on the Move, July 13-17 (GRADES 1-3 & 4-6)
· Thoroughly Modern City, July 20-24 (GRADES 1-3 & 4-6)
· Eco-Explorers, July 27-31(GRADES 1-3 & 4-6)

Camp fees are $200 for members; $250 for nonmembers. Camp hours run Monday through Friday, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm. To register your camper, please call 404.814.4016. For more details and information, visit www.AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/summercamp.
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Summer Camp 2009 at Margaret Mitchell House

This summer, explore a range of topics, engage in quality activities, and expand upon creative skills. Every week has a new theme, so choose your favorites and join us.

· Mystery in the City: The Great Museum Caper, July 6-10 (GRADES 5-9)
· Developing Character: Heroes and Heroines, July 13-17 (GRADES 5-9)
· Stories in Motion: Modeling and Animation, July 20-24 (GRADES 5-9)
· Historical Fiction: Citizens and Soldiers, July 27-31 (GRADES 5-9)

Camp fees are $350 per week for Atlanta History Center members/$400 per week for nonmembers.
Camp hours run Monday through Friday, 9:30 am – 4:30 pm. To register your camper, please call 404.814.4016. For more details and information, visit www.GWTW.org.

Civil War Sunday: AHC lectures featuring Salvatore G. Cilella, Jr. & Wendy Hamand Venet
Sunday, July 12, 2009
1:00 & 3:00 pm

Enjoy an afternoon of book discussions with Salvatore G. Cilella, Jr. and Wendy Hamand Venet.
Salvatore G. Cilella, Jr., discusses his book Upton’s Regulars: The 121st New York Infantry in the Civil War. From Cooperstown and its surrounding region, upstate New Yorkers responded to President
Lincoln’s call to service by volunteering in large numbers to defend an imperiled Union. Drawn from the farms and towns of Otsego and Herkimer Counties, the 121st New York State Volunteer Infantry Regiment served with the Sixth Corps in the Army of the Potomac throughout the Civil War. In the first comprehensive history of the regiment in nearly ninety years, Cilella chronicles the epic story of this heroic “band of brothers.”

Georgia State University professor Wendy Hamand Venet discusses her book Sam Richards's Civil War Diary: A Chronicle of the Atlanta Home Front. This unpublished diary by bookseller Samuel Pearce Richards is the best firsthand account of life in Civil War Atlanta. Out of Richards’ sixty-seven-year diary, this volume excerpts the period from October 1860 to August 1865. The latter is the date when the Richards family returned to Atlanta after having been forced to leave the city by Sherman’s troops, followed by a period of exile in New York City. Richards’ observations include the Union bombardment of Atlanta, the evacuation of Confederates forces, and the entry of the Union Army into the city.

Admission is $5 for members and $10 for nonmembers. Reservations are required for all lectures. For more information, visit www.AtlantaHistoryCenter.com. To purchase tickets, please call 404.814.4150.

MMH Lecture: An Evening with Janis Kearney
Wednesday, July 15, 2009
7:00 pm

Following a journey that led her from the cotton fields of Lincoln County, Arkansas, to the West Wing of the White House, writer, columnist, and oral historian Janis Kearney discusses her experiences during nearly six years as President Clinton’s White House diarist. The fourteenth of nineteen children born into a sharecropping family in the delta region of southeastern Arkansas, Kearney and her siblings were taught by their parents to dream and to work toward fulfilling their dreams. Kearney published the historic Arkansas State Press for a number of years before joining Clinton's administration as his personal diarist, the first such presidential appointment. Kearney is the author of books and articles, including Something to Write Home About: Memories from a Presidential Diarist, Cotton Field of Dreams, and Once Upon a Time, There was a Girl: A Murder at Mobile Bay.

This lecture is held at Margaret Mitchell House in Midtown. Admission is $5 for members and $10 for nonmembers. Reservations are required for all lectures. For more information, visit GWTW.org. To purchase tickets, please call 404.814.4150.

MMH Lecture: James Gavin, Stormy Weather: The Life of Lena Horne
Wednesday, July 22, 2009
7:00 pm

From the Cotton Club's glory days and the back lots of Hollywood's biggest studios to the glitzy, but bigoted, hotels of Las Vegas, this behind-the-scenes look at an American icon is as much a story of the limits of the American dream as it is a masterful, ground-breaking biography. Often limited to guest singing appearances in Hollywood musicals, “the beautiful Lena Horne,” was a pioneering African American star in the 1940s and 1950s. Gavin offers a fascinating portrait of a complex, even tragic Horne, who inspired Barbra Streisand, Eartha Kitt, and Aretha Franklin. Horne’s frustrations with racism
and with tumultuous childhood left wounds too deep to heal and the woman who emerged was as angry as she was luminous. Drawing on a wealth of new material and hundreds of interviews, including Horne herself, Gavin give us the defining portrait of Horne.

This lecture is held at Margaret Mitchell House in Midtown. Admission is $5 for members and $10 for nonmembers. Reservations are required for all lectures. For more information, visit GWTW.org. To purchase tickets, please call 404.814.4150.

Support: Provided by Swift Currie.

MMH Lecture: Sarah Dunant, Sacred Hearts
Tuesday, July 28, 2009
7:00 pm

The year is 1570, and in the northern Italian city of Ferrara, in the convent of Santa Caterina, one hundred women live inside God’s protection, but any community, however smoothly run, suffers tremors when it takes in someone by force. Sarah Dunant’s new novel, Sacred Hearts, begins with the dramatic arrival of Santa Caterina’s new novice, Serafina, whose forced admission into the convent sets in motion a chain of events that will shake the institution to its core.

Dunant brings this intricate, Renaissance world compellingly to life. Amid the tangled threads of scandal and conspiracy, rules and rituals, obedience and subtle acts of rebellion, secrets lie within secrets, and ordinary though no less glorious miracles happen when least expected. Thoroughly researched and beautifully written, Sacred Hearts is a rich, suspenseful, multifaceted love story, from the passions of the flesh to the exultation of the spirit and the deep, enduring power of friendship.

Sarah Dunant is the author of the international bestseller The Birth of Venus, which has received major acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic, and In the Company of the Courtesan. Her earlier novels include three Hannah Wolfe crime thrillers, as well as Snowstorms in a Hot Climate, Transgressions, and Mapping the Edge. She has two daughters, and lives in London and Florence.

This lecture is held at Margaret Mitchell House in Midtown. Admission is $5 for members and $10 for nonmembers. Reservations are required for all lectures. For more information, visit GWTW.org. To purchase tickets, please call 404.814.4150.

August 2009

MMH Lecture: George Dawes Green, Ravens
Tuesday, August 4, 2009
7:00 pm

In Ravens, we meet the Boatwrights, a Georgia family that has won over $300 million in the lottery. We also meet Shaw McBride and Romeo Zderko, two would-be crooks trying to claim the prize money for themselves by any means, including holding the Boatwright family hostage.

George Dawes Green is the author of the critically acclaimed novels, The Caveman’s Valentine and The Juror. The Caveman’s Valentine was a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice and won a 1994 Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America. The Juror was a 1995 New York Times bestseller and the basis of a Columbia Pictures motion picture. Green is the founder of the Moth, an organization dedicated to promoting the art of storytelling.

This lecture is held at Margaret Mitchell House in Midtown. Admission is $5 for members and $10 for nonmembers. Reservations are required for all lectures. For more information, visit GWTW.org. To purchase tickets, please call 404.814.4150.

Homeschool Day: Open House
Monday, August 10, 2009
10:00 am – 5:00 pm

The Atlanta History Center offers special monthly programs for homeschool students and their families. This month, homeschooling families are invited to explore our facility free of charge and see what the Atlanta History Center has to offer!

For more information please call 404.814.4018, email Homeschool@AtlantaHistoryCenter.com, or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/homeschool.

Support: Funding for this program is provided by the Fulton County Board of Commissioners under the guidance of the Fulton County Arts Council.

From This Land
Sunday, August 23, 2009
12:00 – 5:00 pm

Explore Native American history and culture through a variety of activities and demonstrations designed for all ages. Enjoy cooking demonstrations, traditional dance performances, tours of the Quarry Garden, and tours of the Native Lands exhibition. Other unique program offerings include a lesson in language with Cherokee 101 and hands-on activities such as corn grinding and corn husk doll making.

This program is free to members; included in the cost of general admission for nonmembers. For more information about this program, please contact 404.814.4000 or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com.

Support: Funding for this program is provided by the Fulton County Board of Commissioners under the guidance of Fulton County Arts Council.
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Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture Brings “Treasures” to Charleston and St. Helena Island May 30 and 31

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture will co-host two weekend programs to help Charleston, S.C., area residents identify and preserve items of historical and cultural significance tucked away in the attics, closets and basements of their homes. Presented in collaboration with the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture at the College of Charleston, the International African American Museum, the Old Slave Market and the Penn Center on St. Helena Island, the events will feature presentations, hands-on activities and preservation tips.

The first event will take place Saturday, May 30, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Burke High School, 244 President Street, Charleston. The second event will take place Sunday, May 31, from noon to 5:30 p.m. at the Penn Center, 16 Penn Center Circle West, St. Helena Island. The events are the fourth and fifth in a series from the museum’s signature program “Save Our African American Treasures: A National Collections Initiative of Discovery and Preservation.”

Participants can reserve in advance to bring up to three personal items for a 20-minute, one-on-one professional consultation with experts on how to care for them. The specialists will serve as reviewers, not appraisers, and will not determine items’ monetary values. Objects such as books, paper and textiles no larger than a shopping bag (furniture, carpets and paintings are excluded) can be reviewed. Those wishing to have items reviewed must make reservations online at treasures@si.edu or by telephone at (202) 633-9599. Reservations are not required for those not wishing a one-on-one consultation.

More than 150 people brought family objects to the first “Treasures” event held in Chicago in January 2008. In the crowd was Patricia Heaston of Chicago, who brought a white Pullman porter cap and a gold-colored pin bearing the image of an African American woman. She learned that the white Pullman porter cap was rare (most caps were black or blue), and its color meant that its owner had tended to prominent travelers (perhaps even Presidents) on a private train car. The image on the pin was that of Madame C.J. Walker (1867-1919), the first African American female self-made millionaire. The pin was probably given as a prize to successful sales agents of Walker’s hair-care products. Nearly 100 people attended the “Treasures” event in July 2008 in Los Angeles.

“We are very excited to bring ‘Treasures’ to Charleston and St. Helena Island,” said Lonnie G. Bunch III, founding director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. “We must encourage private citizens to become aware of what they have, to protect it and to preserve it so the story of the African American in this country can be told. Private citizens hold the 19th- and 20th-century objects—family photographs, military uniforms, farm tools, and wedding dresses—that can help tell this story for future generations. If we do not act now to preserve these items, the tangible evidence of a critical component of American history will be lost.”

Future events will be held in Atlanta and New York. “Treasures” has been made possible by a grant from the Bank of America Charitable Foundation. Its $1 million grant to the museum also supports the pre-design and construction of the museum on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., scheduled to open in 2015.

“Bank of America is committed to the preservation of our national heritage,” said Chris Latham, Charleston president of the Bank of America. “We are proud to bring the ‘Save Our African American Treasures’ workshop into our communities and encourage everyone to become aware of the important role they can play in preserving mementos and treasures for other generations to enjoy.”

The “Treasures” program includes the following sessions:

Preservation Presentations: Three informal basic preservation sessions will take place during the day. In the session on photographs and paper, participants will learn about light, heat and humidity and how it affects their family collections. They will discover simple things they can do to be good stewards of their family paper and photography collections. In another presentation, Smithsonian staff will share stories about how conservators use science, art history and skilled hands to preserve artwork at the Smithsonian Institution. One final presentation will focus on preparing for disasters.

Hands-on Preservation: Participants are invited to learn how to properly store letters,
pack garments and prepare photographs for preservation storage and presentation.
Your Story/Our Story—Recording Oral Histories: Participants may record a brief personal memory, a family story or a memory of a historical event. Family members are encouraged to interview each other.

As a companion to the series, the museum has produced “African American Treasures: A Preservation Guide,” a 30-page guidebook that is distributed free to attendees at the program and to individuals, community groups and educators to highlight the importance of proper preservation techniques. The guidebook is part of the “Treasures” kit. Also distributed will be white cotton gloves, archival tissue papers and archival documents sleeves to help people keep their personal treasures safe.

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Sunday, May 10, 2009

Hooked on Mom

Editor's Note: Happy Mother's Day to all moms. Moms have such a tremendous job to do in raising their children. Recent reports show a mom's yearly compensation is worth around $200,000. Guess how many hugs and skinned knees that translates in to?

PRNewswire- Profile America -- Sunday, May 10th. Today is Mother's Day -- one of the nation's most honored national observances. The idea started in 1908 with Anna Jarvis of West Virginia, to honor her recently departed mother -- who had voiced the hope that sometime there would be a day to commemorate all mothers. By 1911, every state observed Mother's Day, and in 1914, Congress made it a national event. There are nearly 83 million mothers across the U.S. Each year, just over 4 million women have babies. Of these, 435,000 are teenagers 15 to 19, and at the other end of the age scale, more than 112,000 are 40 or older. The average age of women giving birth for the first time is 25.

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Saturday, May 9, 2009

Sam Haskell at Margaret Mitchell House May 12th

You may have seen author Sam Haskell on national TV shows such as The Today Show, CBS This Morning, Fox and Friends, and Tavis Smiley over the past two weeks but Tuesday visitors will have the chance to see him live at the Lit Center at Margaret Mitchell House as he discusses his book, Promises I Made My Mother.

Watch Today's Matt Laurer talk to Sam Haskell.
Location and Time
Tuesday, May 12th; 7:00 PM
The Lit Center at Margaret Mitchell House
990 Peachtree Street
Atlanta, GA 30309
404.249.7015

Admission
$5 members; $10 non-members

About the Book
"What would my mother say?" Sam Haskell, former Worldwide Head of Television for the William Morris Agency, asked himself that question more than once in his life. During his long career, Haskell handled some of the hottest stars and packaged some of the highest-rated shows on television. A Mississippi native, Haskell's devoted and indomitable mother, Mary, instilled in him values of faith, integrity, and honor. As a result, this small-town boy became successful beyond his dreams and his roots and values guide him to this day. In Promises I Made My Mother, Haskell reveals how the pledge he made his mother to live a decent life allowed him to thrive as both a husband and father as well as in the competitive, shark-infested waters of Hollywood.

Reservations are requested. To make a reservation or for additional information, call 404.814.4150.
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