Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Quick! September 17- What Day Is It?

Think, think, think.  Remember those history lessons of old?  Nope, it's not the birthday of a famous president.  Nope, it's not the day somebody rode a horse.

It's Constitution Day!  The day in time when the delegates who had been summoned to Philadelphia signed our current form of government into existence.  After months of debate through a long, hot summer, today is the day when the pen was inked and paper signed.

This is such an important part of our nation's history, yet so few of our population even think of it.  Thanks to the Daughters of the American Revolution for reminding us
that all Americans should stand up and shout "Happy Constitution Day."

From the James Waldrop Chapter of the National Society of the DAR in Fayetteville, GA, come the following words in honor of the day.


This month we celebrate the 226th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution by 39 delegates from the 13 colonies.  This celebration of America’s most important document is one of the country’s least known official observances. Our Constitution stands as a testament to the tenacity of Americans throughout history to maintain their liberties and freedom, and to ensure those inalienable rights to every American.
The tradition of celebrating the Constitution was started years ago by the Daughters of the American Revolution. In 1955, the Daughters petitioned Congress to set aside September 17-23 annually to be dedicated for the observance of Constitution Week. That resolution was signed into law in 1956 by President Eisenhower.
In the words of our President, “In signing the Constitution, the framers provided a model of American leadership for generations to come. Through controversy and division, they built a lasting structure of government that began with the words, ‘We the people’ this week we celebrate our Founders' timeless vision, we resolve to stay true to their spirit of patriotism and unity."

Thursday, September 20, 2012

Georgia Closes State Archives to the Public?

The sounds of "With a rebel yell, she cried more, more, more" are resounding in the streets and mailboxes of genealogists and family history seekers everywhere. Without our past, we have no future.  Step up and save the Georgia Archives for the public.  Don't let Georgia be the ONLY state in the union with no public access and extremely limited private access!

How can the Secretary of State Brian Kemp close the Georgia State Archives to the public?  And this is in the same week that Governor Nathan Deal proclaimed October as Georgia Archives Month.

There is much to read on this subject.  The best way to do so is to follow along with the Friends of the Georgia Archives as they spearhead the fight to save the archives.



Below is the call to battle from the Friends of Georgia Archives and History:

ACTION ALERT: SAVE THE GEORGIA ARCHIVES!
Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp has announced that the Georgia Archives will be CLOSED to all public access beginning November 1, 2012. He cites as reason the requirement for a 3 % budget reduction for all state agencies. Secretary Kemp has chosen to take the required cut of $750,000 entirely and only from the State Archives. In addition to the elimination of public access, staff reductions concerning the ten remaining staff are planned and will also be announced soon.

This action further cripples an institution that was among the first state archives established (1918), has won many awards for its programs and state-of-the-art archival facility, and has been a respected leader in archives, government records programs, and research use. Over the past decade, however, the Georgia Archives has been eviscerated by regular budget cuts, reductions in staff and reductions in public hours to 2 days a week. Now Secretary Kemp wants to eliminate even those few hours of access for Georgia’s citizens, making Georgia Archives the only state archives without public access hours.

HOW CAN YOU HELP?
Tell the Governor, the Secretary of State and the Georgia Legislature to reverse this devastating decision. Write, call or visit and ask them to:

Restore a minimum of $1 million to the Georgia Archives budget to return its operations to 5 days a week of public access hours and eliminate projected staff reductions.

Reverse the Secretary of State’s proposed budget cuts to the Archives by November 1 to ensure uninterrupted service to the public.

When you write/call or visit, focus on a few of the points below. Put this in your own words, and use your own examples, particularly if you are a citizen of Georgia:

WHAT SHOULD YOU SAY?
Points to make in letters/phone calls or visits:

1. The Secretary of State was directed to reduce his budget expenditures by 3%. The entire sum needed to accomplish that has been taken from the Archives budget alone and will result in the termination of all public hours. The proposed “access by appointment…limited based on the schedule of the remaining employees” effectively denies access based on “reasonable time and place” for inspection of public records as required by Georgia law.

2. Points to make regarding the importance of access to government records for accountability and legal purposes:
• This deprives citizens of regular and predictable access, as mandated in the Georgia Records Act, Title 50, Chapter 18, Article 4, section 70(b) of the Georgia Annotated Code that all public records “shall be open for a personal inspection by any citizen of this state at a reasonable time and place, and those in charge of such records shall not refuse this privilege to any citizen.”
• It is contrary to the practice of government transparency by depriving citizens of predictable and ready access to the records that are essential to providing evidence of government accountability.
• It deprives citizens, as well as Georgia’s own government, of access to records needed to support due process of law. The Georgia Archives holdings have been used for a range of court cases including land claims, boundary disputes, utility right-of-way, and claims against state agencies.
• Access to records is essential to avoid costly litigation that will result if records cannot be located or accessed.

3. Points to make regarding the importance of access to government records for research
purposes:
• As the Civil War Sesquicentennial begins, researchers need access to the historical record in the Georgia Archives to provide accurate, factual evidence of that experience. Many of Georgia’s governmental records were destroyed during Sherman’s March; closing the Archives similarly deprives Georgians of access to their heritage—but this time the fault does not lie with an invading army, but with Georgia officials themselves.
• The Georgia Archives holds records actively sought by genealogists and family historians; in particular, they provide essential evidence for African-American history and genealogical research not available in many private historical collections.
• The Georgia Archives has been an essential resource for environmental research and activities including efforts to reintroduce the American chestnut tree in the state and issues relating to pollution.
• The Georgia Archives has been the site of research for television and films, including the popular NBC series “Who Do You Think You Are” segments with Paula Deen and Spike Lee, as well as Emmy award-winner Ben Loeterman’s documentary “People v. Leo Frank.”

Governor Nathan Deal
206 Washington Street Suite 203, State Capitol Atlanta, GA 30334
Phone: 404-656-1776

Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle
240 State Capitol Atlanta, GA 30334 TEL: 404-656-5030 FAX: 404-656-6739

Secretary of State Brian Kemp
214 State Capitol Atlanta, GA 30334 Phone: 404-656-2881 Fax: 404-656-0513

Individual Georgia legislators: find specific legislators via Society of Georgia Archivists site: http://soga.org/involvement/legislative

If you’ve signed an online petition, that’s helpful, but direct contact is even more effective. For Georgians, a visit to your local legislator will have even more impact. There has been a great deal of attention on radio, newspapers, television and the Internet. In a democracy, however, nothing speaks to the governor or elected officials like direct contact from individuals. Speak up for the Georgia Archives.

Write, call or plan a visit today!
Please send copies of your letter, information on contacts, or any questions to:
Coalition to Preserve the Georgia Archives Co-Chair Kaye L. Minchew: kaye@trouparchives.org

THE COALITION TO PRESERVE THE GEORGIA ARCHIVES
Includes representatives of:
Friends of the Georgia Archives; Association of County Commissioners of Georgia; Georgia Salzburger Society, Greater Atlanta Chapter; Society of Georgia Archivists; Georgia Historical Records Advisory Board; Georgia Genealogical Society; Georgia Professional Genealogists; Association of Professional Genealogists, Georgia Chapter; Cobb County Genealogical Society; Troup County Historical Society; Georgia State Society, Daughters of the American Revolution

For updated information go to: www.FOGAH.org

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Genealogy Research & Workshop Day, January 21 at Clayton State

The Clayton State Genealogy Group will have a research and workshop day on Saturday, Jan. 21.

All interested parties are invited to join the group from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in room L200 of the Clayton State University Library. (Please enter the Library through the courtyard.) There will be several speakers and plenty of research time.

The workshop is free. Participants should bring their own lunch or a dish to share at the potluck lunch. Vending machines will also be available. There will also be door prizes.

Participants are urged to bring their laptops, or paper files, or anything that needs to be scanned. Experienced genealogy enthusiasts will also be present to help research and organization, and the Ancestry Library edition will be free to use.

“We will be discussing family group sheets, pedigree charts and how to use citations,” says Clayton State Archivist Rosemary Fischer. “We will learn what you should bring when you are researching away from home and new ideas on how to collect information at a family reunion. Learn organizing tips for your paper and digital files and photographs, plus creative ideas on sharing family history.”

Learn more at http://ourgenealogygroup.blogspot.com.

For questions and to RSVP, contact Angela Pendleton at ourgenalogygroup@gmail.com, or call (678) 386-3490, or call Fischer at (678) 466-4333.

A unit of the University System of Georgia, Clayton State University is an outstanding comprehensive metropolitan university located 15 miles southeast of downtown Atlanta.

Friday, May 20, 2011

Augusta 2011: A Year of Milestones

/PRNewswire/ - History, golf, Southern hospitality, and James Brown are center stage in 2011 - a year of milestones for Augusta, GA with the 75th Masters Tournament, the Civil War Sesquicentennial, the fifth anniversary of James Brown's passing, and the 150th anniversary of the historic Summerville neighborhood. www.augustaga.org

Although the Masters Tournament celebrated its 75th tournament in April, visitors to the city can continue to experience the golf connection. At the Augusta Museum of History, "Celebrating a Grand Tradition, the Sport of Golf," explores how golf has evolved over the centuries and features memorabilia and famous personalities www.augustamuseum.org Golfers who want to walk in the legends' footsteps can play on affordable courses - Forest Hills Golf Club, The Club at Jones Creek and The River Course.

2011 begins the nation's commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and many of Augusta's landmarks have close ties to the era. The Confederate Powderworks Chimney, the last remaining piece of the only factory built by the Confederate Army, is a part of The Augusta Canal National Heritage Area which offers guided tours on replica Petersburg boats. www.augustacanal.com The Augusta Museum of History also features Civil War relics such as the CSA Second National Flag and a 12-pound bronze Napoleon Cannon tube manufactured at the Augusta foundry. The Boyhood Home of Woodrow Wilson focuses on the life of the 28th President, who witnessed the destruction that war caused as his father's church across the street was turned into a hospital. Today, the national historic landmark and museum offers a glimpse of Wilson's life during that time. www.wilsonboyhoodhome.org

James Brown called Augusta his home and his presence is still felt. A one-of-a-kind exhibit at the Augusta Museum of History features rare memorabilia and personal artifacts that vividly tell the story of The Godfather of Soul's life. Also, standing in downtown Augusta is a life-size bronze of Brown where visitors can take photos.

Celebrating its150th year, the Summerville neighborhood features Augusta's most architecturally distinctive homes. Every October, the neighborhood opens its homes with the annual Tour of Homes. A tour stop includes The Partridge Inn, which celebrated a centennial in 2010.

-----

Community News You Can Use
Click to read MORE news:
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
Twitter: @gafrontpage & @TheGATable @HookedonHistory
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
Twitter: @artsacrossga, @softnblue, @RimbomboAAG @FayetteFP

Monday, May 16, 2011

Remembering Allegheny County Area World War I Veterans

During the last year, a group of 46 volunteers has been reading the old Pittsburgh area newspapers in search of deaths, marriages, divorces and photographs. This group has indexed over 73,000 death entries which can be found on the PA USGenWeb Archives pages.

Last December, one of the faithful volunteers contacted the coordinator to see if there would be interest in setting up a new index specifically for those Allegheny County area men and women who served America in World War I.

The index posed was readily accepted by coordinator Ann S Eldredge. So volunteer, Lynn Beatty who had grown up in Allegheny County and left the area some 30 years ago, spent five months indexing the World War I veterans. This military index includes the names found in the 1918-1919 Pittsburgh newspapers, the letters, the stories, the deaths and the celebrations of coming home.

When asked why she wanted to do this index, Beatty said, "When I saw some of the articles were personal about western Pennsylvanians, I knew somebody had to make a record of those. It just snowballed! This is the part of genealogy I like best - the stories about real people - like the soldier whose family was being evicted while he was a POW."

Coordinator Eldredge smiles as she recalls the thrill she felt when her grandfather's name was found. "HIs service records had been lost in the fire," she said. "All I had was his Company and his Infantry unit. Those I found on his headstone. I had researched the history of his unit and was surprised to see the 11th Infantry had seen 43 days of combat with 386 casualties. Of these, 348 were wounded in action, including my grandfather."

"Lynn's dedication to the project brought some joy to me as I found when my grandpa returned to the United States, and more specifically, to Pittsburgh. Now, I can identify the location and approximate date of the picture I have of him sitting in front of the US General Hospital #24 in Parkview Station with his future bride."

The Military Index now contains 85733 entries, and can be seen at Norm Meinert's Allegheny River Family Archives, http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~njm1/index.html
or on the PA USGenWebArchives, http://www.usgwarchives.net/pa/allegheny/death-index.htm .

The Military Index can be searched to locate the veteran's name,type of article, unit of service, newspaper name, date and page. With this information, the Allegheny River Family Archives can be utilized to go to the actual date the information appears.

Eldredge said, "It's just a wonderful gift of love Lynn has given to the genealogy community that has its heart in Pittsburgh. This genealogy group is just so giving- of themselves and their time in an unending quest to help others."

Ann S Eldredge



Community News You Can Use
Click to read MORE news:
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
Twitter: @gafrontpage & @TheGATable @HookedonHistory
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
Twitter: @artsacrossga, @softnblue, @RimbomboAAG @FayetteFP

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Battle Rages in Georgia as History Goes Live

/PRNewswire/ -- Guns will fire, horses will charge, flags will wave, and men will "die" on May 20 – 22 as fighting ensues in a dramatic reenactment of the 1864 Battle of Resaca in Gordon County, GA. Authentically clad soldiers will converge on the original conflict site to commemorate the 147th anniversary of a turning point in the Civil War, the first major battle in General William Sherman's March to the Sea and the eventual burning of Atlanta. The reenactment is one of few to occur on an original battle site. The public is invited to witness history recreated.

The Battle of Resaca Reenactment will occur on the 480-acre Chitwood Farm, which was recently protected as part of the full 650-acre battlefield site. In 2008, when owners of the site had financial difficulties, The Trust for Public Land bought the land. Two months ago, TPL sold to Gordon County an easement, which forever protects the land from development.

There was fierce fighting at the original Battle of Resaca, including the awarding of two Medals of Honor for capturing Confederate guns.

Primary scenes from the original battle will be recreated when the bugler sounds the charge at 2 p.m. each day. Other battle-related activities will take place during the three-day commemoration. Visit http://www.georgiadivision.org/bor_reenactment.html for directions and more information.

TPL's conservation of the Chitwood Farm in time for the 150th Civil War anniversary in 2014, allows for continuation of plans that will include educational activities for area students, Civil War tours about Sherman's March on Atlanta, and the annual Resaca Battle Reenactment.

The Trust for Public Land is a non-profit organization and depends on the support and generosity of individuals, foundations, and businesses to achieve their land for people mission. For more information, visit www.tpl.org.

-----

Community News You Can Use
Click to read MORE news:
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
Twitter: @gafrontpage & @TheGATable @HookedonHistory
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
Twitter: @artsacrossga, @softnblue, @RimbomboAAG @FayetteFP

Tuesday, May 3, 2011

Touch the Moon at NASA's Exhibit in Atlanta and Carrollton, GA

/PRNewswire/ -- Georgians have the rare chance to touch a nearly 4-billion-year-old piece of moon rock at NASA's Driven to Explore traveling exhibit, a mobile, multi-media experience that immerses visitors in the story of NASA.

The exhibit will be at the Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta on Thursday, May 5, and Friday, May 6, noon to 10 p.m. EDT. It also will be at the Mayfest Arts and Crafts Festival in Carrollton, Ga. on Saturday, May 7, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

The centerpiece of Driven to Explore is the opportunity to touch a lunar rock sample brought to Earth by the astronauts of Apollo 17 in 1972, America's last human mission to the moon. The rock is one of only eight lunar samples made available for the public to touch.

Driven to Explore allows visitors to learn why we explore, discover the challenges of human space exploration and how NASA provides critical technological advances to improve life on Earth. The exhibit also details the accomplishments of the space shuttle and the International Space Station.

As the space shuttle approaches retirement, NASA is investing in the building blocks of a more capable approach to space exploration, including research and development to increase space travel capabilities. In support of these efforts, NASA is performing field tests, designing surface systems and conducting advanced human research to ensure that future missions are safe, sustainable and affordable.

-----

Community News You Can Use
Click to read MORE news:
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
Twitter: @gafrontpage & @TheGATable @HookedonHistory
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
Twitter: @artsacrossga, @softnblue, @RimbomboAAG @FayetteFP

Thursday, April 28, 2011

Sen. Albers to Participate in a March to Remember the Holocaust

State Sen. John Albers (R-Roswell) will participate in the “March of Remembrance” this Sunday, May 1 at Stone Mountain Park to remember the Holocaust. The prayer walk is being organized by the Atlanta Messianic Congregation Beth Adonai. Sen. Albers has been asked to serve as a guest speaker where he will join other lawmakers and honorable guests.

“I’m honored to walk with the members of my community to honor those who suffered this tragic event in our history,” said Albers. “It’s important that we never forget that oppression can lead to such cruelty. These community events are a way to lift our voices as one against such hatred and teach future generations the lessons learned from the Holocaust.”

The two mile march will begin at 10:00 a.m. at Stone Mountain Park, and is open to the public. To register, please visit www.bethadonai.com.

This year marks the sixth annual March of Remembrance that began in Germany in 2006. In just a year, the prayer marches had spread to Washington, D.C., the Ukraine and cities throughout the U.S. For more information on these historic marches, or for a list of marches taking place all over the world on May 1, visit www.MarchofRememberance.org.

-----

Community News You Can Use
Click to read MORE news:
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
Twitter: @gafrontpage & @TheGATable @HookedonHistory
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
Twitter: @artsacrossga, @softnblue, @RimbomboAAG @FayetteFP

Monday, April 11, 2011

Fayette County Historical Society Now on Facebook

What a great way to keep up with the Fayette County Historical Society.  The Society has just joined Facebook.  So log on, and learn more about the history our county has lived.

Note:  Be sure to use Fayette Co Historical Society while searching for the society. 

Community News You Can Use
Click to read MORE news:
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
Twitter: @gafrontpage & @TheGATable @HookedonHistory
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
Twitter: @artsacrossga, @softnblue, @RimbomboAAG @FayetteFP

Gallery Seeks WW II Era Artifacts for New Exhibit

A German officer’s ceremonial sword, passports of an Auschwitz survivor, a copy of Hitler’s Mein Kampf, and a rare B-17 bombsight are the first four artifacts that have been donated to the Israel Arbeiter Gallery of Understanding at the South Area Solomon Schechter Day School in Norwood (Mass.).

This past year supporters of the Gallery launched a campaign to collect and preserve memorabilia from the pre-war through post-World War II era, mainly between 1933-1948 – from the rise of the Nazis to the founding of the modern State of Israel.

“World War II era books, letters, photos and other artifacts are in danger of being lost, thrown out, or sold,” says Gallery Co-Chair Dr. Gila Kriegel. “We hope to create an exhibit that tells the story of that period to students and other visitors in a tangible, dramatic way. We want to ensure that artifacts are permanently preserved so they continue to bear witness to the Holocaust.” The second Gallery co-chair is Irv Kempner. Both are children of Holocaust survivors.

Each artifact has an interesting background of how it found its way to the Gallery, and an exhibit card tells each story.

Dr. Kriegel says, “Many Holocaust survivors, World War II veterans, collectors, historians, their families and others may possess historically important, unique and interesting Holocaust-era artifacts. Here’s a way to preserve rare items and use them for educational purposes for generations to come.”

The focal point of the Gallery is a series of large panels tracing 86 year-old Izzy Arbeiter’s life from pre-war Poland through emigration and building a new life in America. Asked about the mission of the Gallery, he said, “To teach children not to hate.” He said, “We can't ignore people with crazy ideas. They must be stopped before they gain strength." Dedicated three years ago, the Gallery is a meeting place for people of all ages and backgrounds to learn about prejudice and ways to build bridges.
Also on display in the Gallery is artwork on interfaith understanding by Jewish and Catholic children and a display about Raoul Wallenberg, Swedish diplomat credited with saving some 10,000 people from the Nazis, who received (posthumously) the Gallery’s second annual ‘Righteous Among Nations’ Award. Among visitors to the Gallery have been Cardinal Sean O’Malley, Peter Yarrow, Alan Dershowitz, and Loren Galler Rabinowitz, Miss Massachusetts 2010 and granddaughter of Holocaust survivors.

To be accepted, donated items must meet parameters related to historical value, educational aspects, appropriateness for a K – 8 school, etc. Monetary value is not important. Donors could receive a tax deduction in accordance with IRS regulations, and a plaque describes the object’s importance and gives credit to the donors.

Anyone interested in donating papers, photographs or artifacts may contact Stan Hurwitz: 508-269-0570 / stanhurw@comcast.net, or sgoodwin@sassds.org or call 781-769-9400. The Gallery committee is also raising funds to make the exhibit more interactive, to develop an educational curriculum, and to produce a video featuring its namesake. Donations are tax-deductible in accordance with IRS regulations.

-----
Community News You Can Use
Click to read MORE news:
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
Twitter: @gafrontpage & @TheGATable @HookedonHistory
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
Twitter: @artsacrossga, @softnblue, @RimbomboAAG @FayetteFP

Friday, April 8, 2011

Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation Presents 23 Statewide Preservation Awards at Ceremony in Macon

/PRNewswire/ -- The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation presented 23 awards recognizing the best of preservation in Georgia during its 34th annual Preservation Awards ceremony in Macon on April 1.

The Hardman Farm in Sautee, Ga. received the Marguerite Williams Award, presented annually to the project that has had the greatest impact on preservation in the state. The Italianate style house also received an award in the Excellence in Restoration category.

Owned by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the Hardman House is a great example of how preservation and sustainability can work hand in hand for both cultural and environmental conservation. The Garbutt Construction Company carried out a gentle renewal of the Hardman House with the goal of achieving LEED gold certification. With the completion of the restoration, the farm will be open to the public as a Georgia State Historic Site.

The Trust also presented five awards for Excellence in Restoration, nine awards for Excellence in Rehabilitation, three awards for Stewardship, and two for Preservation Service.

The Trust also presented the Camille W. Yow Volunteer of the Year Award to Bonnie Dowling of Macon. The Mary Gregory Jewett Award for Lifetime Preservation Service was given to Jane Symmes. The Piedmont Park Conservancy received the Chairman's Award, which recognizes extraordinary contributions made to the field of preservation, for its preservation of Greystone. The Excellence in Restoration winners were: the Coweta County Courthouse, Newnan; Hardman Farm, Helen; Old Fort Jackson, Savannah; Hills and Dales, LaGrange; and Freeman's Mill, Lawrenceville.

Excellence in Rehabilitation winners were: Campus Theatre and Bookstore, Milledgeville; Clarence Thomas Center for Historic Preservation, Savannah; E.M. Rogers House, Adel; New College at the University of Georgia, Athens; Hallock Cottage, Augusta; Plaza Arts Center, Eatonton; Pulaski County Board of Education, Hawkinsville; the Rock Building, Chatsworth; and the Wynne-Claughton Building (Carnegie Building), Atlanta.

Three awards were given to recognize Stewardship in the field of historic preservation. The winners were: Friends of the Vann House in Chatsworth for their preservation and support of the Vann House, the Shields Etheridge Farm in Jefferson for their new self-guided interpretive program, and the Stumbo Residence in Fort Valley for an addition to a neoclassical style home which left the historic integrity of the existing house intact.

Two awards for Preservation Service were presented. Jim Lockhart was recognized for his lifelong dedication to photographing the buildings and structures throughout Georgia listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Madison Morgan Conservancy's successful efforts to protect over 1,000 sites through conservation easements also received recognition.

"This year's winners represent a tremendous dedication to restoring and revitalizing Georgia's historic buildings and communities," said Mark C. McDonald, president of The Georgia Trust. "We are proud to honor such deserving projects and individuals."

For more than 30 years, the Trust has recognized preservation projects and individuals in the state who have made significant contributions to the field of historic preservation. Awards are presented on the basis of the contributions of the person or project to the community and/or state and on compliance to the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties.

Founded in 1973, The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation is one of the country's largest statewide, nonprofit preservation organizations. The Trust is committed to preserving and enhancing Georgia's communities and their diverse historic resources for the education and enjoyment of all.

The Trust generates community revitalization by finding buyers for endangered properties acquired by its Revolving Fund and raises awareness of other endangered historic resources through an annual listing of Georgia's "10 Places in Peril." The Trust helps revitalize downtowns by providing design and technical assistance in 102 Georgia Main Street cities; trains Georgia's teachers in 63 Georgia school systems to engage students in discovering state and national history through their local historic resources; and advocates for funding, tax incentives and other laws aiding preservation efforts.

To learn more about The Georgia Trust and the Preservation Awards, visit www.georgiatrust.org.

-----
Community News You Can Use
Click to read MORE news:
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
Twitter: @gafrontpage & @TheGATable @HookedonHistory
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
Twitter: @artsacrossga, @softnblue, @RimbomboAAG @FayetteFP

Friday, March 25, 2011

National Infantry Museum to Host Gulf War 20th Anniversary National Tribute May 26 to Honor Service Members Who Lost Lives in Decisive Military Action

/PRNewswire/ -- The National Infantry Museum located outside Fort Benning in Columbus, GA, will host a Gulf War Twentieth Anniversary National Tribute to the men and women killed in service during the Gulf War, on Thursday, May 26, leading off Memorial Day Weekend, from 9-11 a.m. The event will feature laying commemorative granite paved stones to each of the dead during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm and will include participation by the top service commanders from the conflict. Families and unit members will attend and thousands are expected.

"We won rapidly in the Gulf War, but more than 400 men and women gave their lives," says Col. Greg Camp (Ret), Executive Vice President of the National Infantry Foundation. Infantry Foundation Chairman Lieutenant General Carmen Cavezza added, "This event is a long overdue national tribute to the sacrifices our military heroes made to enable a clear victory by the United States and coalition forces. This will be the first official recognition of all Gulf War men and women who died in service."

The National Infantry Museum and Foundation is seeking information from families and unit members of the 408 service members killed in the Gulf War to include at the event. All are invited to come. Persons with information or photos of the 408 are asked to send them to Cyndy Cerbin at ccerbin@nationalinfantryfoundation.org or contact her. "We want families and friends to feel that this is home for recognition of their heroes," said Ben Williams, Executive Director of National Infantry Foundation.

The event's emcee will be retired Four-Star General Barry R. McCaffrey, a division commander in the Gulf War. The top Air Force and Navy commanders in the Gulf War have already indicated participation; Gen. Charles Horner (Ret), and Admiral Stanley Arthur (Ret), as well as LtGen. William M. Keys, USMC (Ret.), who commanded the 2nd Marine Division in the Gulf War. Other leaders from all branches are expected. In addition to the stone pavers and speeches, a military honor guard will march. Taps will be played following the unveiling of the stones and the raising of a new, special, dedicated flag for the Gulf War.

McCaffrey stated, "The Gulf War was a decisive military action. Anyone who comes to the Infantry Museum and sees the powerful exhibits from all of America's wars will understand how appropriate it is that the Gulf War commemoration be hosted here. As a participant in the Gulf War, I am proud that America is giving recognition to those who served and died for their country."

In addition to the May 26 main events, media are invited to a reception with VIP's the night before (time TBD) at the National Infantry Museum and will have the opportunity for advance one-on-one interviews.

In partnership with the Army and the Maneuver Center of Excellence, the Gulf War ceremony will be a special event included at the conclusion of the graduation of a company of new Infantry School soldiers, a powerful message of continuity for the graduates.

For planning purposes, Columbus' airport is served by Delta and American Airlines, or media may wish to fly to Atlanta and rent a car or take a shuttle to Columbus, which has many hotels. Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International airport (ATL) is approximately an hour drive from the National Infantry Museum, and Columbus Airport (CSG) is a twenty minute drive.

The National Infantry Museum and Soldier Center at Patriot Park, a 200-acre tract linking Columbus, Georgia, and Fort Benning, the Home of the Infantry , is the first world-class site to pay tribute to the U.S. Army Infantryman and those who fight alongside him. As the only interactive Army Museum in the United States, the museum showcases the contributions of the Infantry Soldier in every war fought by the U.S. by offering immersive participation and engaging visitors in the unique experiences of the Infantry Soldier. The complex also includes a parade field, memorial walk of honor, authentic World War II Company Street and 3-D IMAX® Theatre. For more information, visit www.nationalinfantrymuseum.com .

-----
Community News You Can Use
Click to read MORE news:
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
Twitter: @gafrontpage & @TheGATable @HookedonHistory
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
Twitter: @artsacrossga, @softnblue, @RimbomboAAG @FayetteFP

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Georgia State Archives Threatened with Closure

Editor Note:  Oh my! So many genealogists and lovers of history visit the Georgia Archives each day to further their research.  Please let your legislative representative hear from you about keeping the doors open.


The following article is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.

The following is an open letter from the Friends of the Georgia Archives and History Chair, Virginia Shadron, concerning legislation currently being debated in the Georgia Legislature. Please forward this to anyone you think would be interested in supporting the Archives.

The Fiscal Year 2012 budget that passed the Georgia House of Representatives on March 11 as HB 78 includes budget reductions that could result in the State Archives closing its doors to the public.

The budget contains two items that together would reduce the Archives’ budget by at least $300,000.

The Archives’ base budget, after preceding budget cuts, is $4,643,588. Over 65% of that goes to pay fixed costs (such as rent) that cannot be reduced. The current bill proposes an additional cut in “personal services and … savings from reduced hours …” in the amount of $260,458. The second way in which the Archives’ budget is eroded is that the House budget does not fund the annual increase in the Archives’ rent, an amount of more than $40,000 for FY12.

Altogether, the additional cuts to personal services and the failure to fund the rent increase means that the Archives’ sustains a critical $300,000 in cuts. You might wonder, “What is the fuss about?” That shortfall can come from one place only—and that is staff.

Without intervention the Archives will almost certainly be forced to close its doors to the public, reduce scanning operations and preservation activities, and eliminate most transfers of records from state agencies—the records that protect Georgia financially and legally.

The House version of the budget now goes to the Senate for adjustment and passage. Call and write your state senator immediately and ask that a minimum of $300,000 be restored to the Archives budget! Go to http://www.legis.ga.gov and click on "Find Your Legislator" to find your senator.

- Virginia Shadron

-----
Community News You Can Use
Click to read MORE news:
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
Twitter: @gafrontpage & @TheGATable @HookedonHistory
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
Twitter: @artsacrossga, @softnblue, @RimbomboAAG @FayetteFP

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Dali Exhibit at Hillel Center Commemorates Jewish History

A set of limited-edition lithographs by Spanish realist Salvador Dali will be exhibited at the Marcus Hillel Center at Emory University from its March 17 opening through June.

Entitled “Aliyah: The Rebirth of Israel,” the little-known suite portraying the epic history of the Jewish diaspora and the return to the homeland was a gift to Emory professor David Blumenthal from his wife, Ursula, commemorating their first date.

On that date in 1965, the couple went to see an exhibit of Dali’s paintings at the Huntington Hartford Museum in New York. 

Blumenthal, the Jay and Leslie Cohen Professor of Judaic Studies in Emory’s Department of Religion, also curated the “Aliyah” exhibit. 



The original “Aliyah” works took two years for Dali to complete, and were commissioned by Shorewood Publishers, a New York firm noted for art publications.

After its grand opening at the Huntington Hartford Museum’s Gallery of Modern Art in New York on April 1, 1968, 250 sets of 25 lithographs each were produced and then the stones were destroyed, ensuring that there would be no more reprints; the Blumenthal’s (No. 150) is the only known set in Atlanta.

For the Hillel exhibit, Blumenthal has organized the lithographs—all of which are signed and many of them dated—historically and thematically. A favorite section is the four iconic images of exile and hope: “A Voice is heard in Ramah,” “The Wailing Wall,” “For it is thy life and the length of thy days” and “Return, O virgin of Israel.”



“The Hebrew word ‘aliyah’ means ‘ascent.’ In later Hebrew, it was broadened to mean ‘to ascend to the land of Israel,’ ” says David Blumenthal. “After centuries of oppression in the exile, ‘aliyah’ is a commitment to the rebirth of the Jewish people, to the renaissance of the Jewish spirit, in its own space.”

The set of 25 colored prints was kept in its original box and stored safely under the couple’s piano for nearly 30 years, until Ursula Blumenthal had the idea of displaying the series in honor of Emory’s new Marcus Hillel Center, which opened last September.

“I am so glad it’s here where it can be seen and appreciated,” she says.

The exhibit is sponsored in part by the Consulate General of Israel to the Southeast, Emory University Office of the President, the Emory Center for Creativity and the Arts’ David Goldwasser Series in Religion and the Arts, the Blonder Family Foundation, Shirley Blaine, the Cohen Chair of Judaic Studies, and the Tam Institute of Jewish Studies.

An audio tour, narrated by Blumenthal, is available for free download via iTunes U on iPod Touch or iPhone. Visitors can check out iPods at the Marcus Hillel Center reception desk.

For more information visit Hillel at Emory.


-----
Community News You Can Use
Click to read MORE news:
www.GeorgiaFrontPage.com
Twitter: @gafrontpage & @TheGATable @HookedonHistory
www.ArtsAcrossGeorgia.com
Twitter: @artsacrossga, @softnblue, @RimbomboAAG @FayetteFP